1. The Father of Spin: Edward L. Bernays and The Birth of Public Relations

Larry Tye

The Father of Spin is the first full-length biography of the legendary Edward L. Bernays, who, beginning in the 1920s, was one of the first and most successful practitioners of the art of public relations. In this engrossing biography, Larry Tye uses Bernays’s life as a prism to understand the evolution of the craft of public relations and how it came to play such a critical-and sometimes insidious-role in American life.

Drawing on interviews with primary sources and voluminous private papers, Tye presents a fascinating and revealing portrait of the man who, more than any other, defined and personified public relations, a profession that today helps shape our political discourse and define our commercial choices.

    The Father of Spin: Edward L. Bernays and The Birth of Public Relations

    Larry Tye

    The Father of Spin is the first full-length biography of the legendary Edward L. Bernays, who, beginning in the 1920s, was one of the first and most successful practitioners of the art of public relations. In this engrossing biography, Larry Tye uses Bernays’s life as a prism to understand the evolution of the craft of public relations and how it came to play such a critical-and sometimes insidious-role in American life.

    Drawing on interviews with primary sources and voluminous private papers, Tye presents a fascinating and revealing portrait of the man who, more than any other, defined and personified public relations, a profession that today helps shape our political discourse and define our commercial choices.

  2. Sex in Psychoanalysis

Sandor Ferenczi

Ferenczi takes as his first axis of reference the parallelism between catastrophic moments in the development of the embryo (or ontogenesis) on the one hand, and in the evolution of the species (or phylogenesis) on the other. Proposing a vast fresco, summarized in a synoptic table of presumed parallels  and based on Lamarck’s evolutionary theories and on Haeckel’s fundamental rule of recapitulation, which it rounds out, he brings together two seemingly distinct temporal perspectives: the time of the germ cell, when the human was a mere monoblast destined by fertilization to become an egg, then an embryo, and after birth to continue living in an extended dependency on the environment; and the time that begins with the emergence of organic life on earth, and which can be described by reference to the various ice ages of the Quaternary era.

How many tens of thousands of years were thus recapitulated in the transformation of the ovum into the newborn? As Nicolas Abraham  notes, this “cosmogonic epic seeks its meaning in the automatism of repetition itself.”

The second yardstick introduced by Ferenczi in his interpretation of the erotic meaning of reality, of coitus, of sleep, or of sexual impotence is regression. For the adult man, coitus embodies a striving on the part of the ego toward a threefold identification: a symbolic identification of the whole organism with the phallic function; a hallucinatory (or specular) identification with the feminine partner; and a real identification, effected as “the genital secretion [does] in very truth penetrate into the uterus”, as the biology of pleasure makes the regeneration of the human being into a material reality. Ferenczi ascribes a traumatolytic function to the orgasm. To buttress these analogies, he takes as a model the fusion of sexual cells familiar to embryology, extrapolating the notion of “amphimixis” to account for the partial erotisms of different organs. By analogy with disturbances of language, he describes erectile dysfunction as “a kind of genital stuttering” (p. 9). He dubs his working method “utraquism,” meaning that a single phenomenon may be viewed in two complementary perspectives, so that technique and theory have a recursive relationship.

The ramifications of this text of Ferenczi’s were considerable. In Totem and Taboo , Freud had constructed a myth of the origin of civilization on the basis of an animal, human, and/or divine parricide, reparation for which was due “out of love for the father” and not just “in the name of the father” (fraternal alliances, codification of the prohibition against incest); in Thalassa, Ferenczi evokes a carnival of bodily organs whose regressions serve to actualize symbolic remnants (marriage bonds, the search for the child within the adult after post-traumatic fragmentation, and so on).

With respect to later psychoanalysts, it is clear that Thalassa is an anticipation of Jacques Lacan’s thinking on the logic of the unconscious and of his topography of the Imaginary, the Symbolic, and the Real. The work also foreshadows future psychosomatic studies (which Ferenczi calls bioanalysis). It is worth noting that such authors as Pierre Teilhard de Chardin, André Leroi-Gourhan, Konrad Lorenz, Yves Coppens, and René Thom have arrived in this connection at equally original hypotheses.

    Sex in Psychoanalysis

    Sandor Ferenczi

    Ferenczi takes as his first axis of reference the parallelism between catastrophic moments in the development of the embryo (or ontogenesis) on the one hand, and in the evolution of the species (or phylogenesis) on the other. Proposing a vast fresco, summarized in a synoptic table of presumed parallels and based on Lamarck’s evolutionary theories and on Haeckel’s fundamental rule of recapitulation, which it rounds out, he brings together two seemingly distinct temporal perspectives: the time of the germ cell, when the human was a mere monoblast destined by fertilization to become an egg, then an embryo, and after birth to continue living in an extended dependency on the environment; and the time that begins with the emergence of organic life on earth, and which can be described by reference to the various ice ages of the Quaternary era.

    How many tens of thousands of years were thus recapitulated in the transformation of the ovum into the newborn? As Nicolas Abraham notes, this “cosmogonic epic seeks its meaning in the automatism of repetition itself.”

    The second yardstick introduced by Ferenczi in his interpretation of the erotic meaning of reality, of coitus, of sleep, or of sexual impotence is regression. For the adult man, coitus embodies a striving on the part of the ego toward a threefold identification: a symbolic identification of the whole organism with the phallic function; a hallucinatory (or specular) identification with the feminine partner; and a real identification, effected as “the genital secretion [does] in very truth penetrate into the uterus”, as the biology of pleasure makes the regeneration of the human being into a material reality. Ferenczi ascribes a traumatolytic function to the orgasm. To buttress these analogies, he takes as a model the fusion of sexual cells familiar to embryology, extrapolating the notion of “amphimixis” to account for the partial erotisms of different organs. By analogy with disturbances of language, he describes erectile dysfunction as “a kind of genital stuttering” (p. 9). He dubs his working method “utraquism,” meaning that a single phenomenon may be viewed in two complementary perspectives, so that technique and theory have a recursive relationship.

    The ramifications of this text of Ferenczi’s were considerable. In Totem and Taboo , Freud had constructed a myth of the origin of civilization on the basis of an animal, human, and/or divine parricide, reparation for which was due “out of love for the father” and not just “in the name of the father” (fraternal alliances, codification of the prohibition against incest); in Thalassa, Ferenczi evokes a carnival of bodily organs whose regressions serve to actualize symbolic remnants (marriage bonds, the search for the child within the adult after post-traumatic fragmentation, and so on).

    With respect to later psychoanalysts, it is clear that Thalassa is an anticipation of Jacques Lacan’s thinking on the logic of the unconscious and of his topography of the Imaginary, the Symbolic, and the Real. The work also foreshadows future psychosomatic studies (which Ferenczi calls bioanalysis). It is worth noting that such authors as Pierre Teilhard de Chardin, André Leroi-Gourhan, Konrad Lorenz, Yves Coppens, and René Thom have arrived in this connection at equally original hypotheses.

  3. The Language of Psycho-Analysis

Jean Laplanche

The definitive guide to psychoanalytic vocabulary. An indispensible reference book for anyone interested in psychoanalysis. 
Sigmund Freud evolved his theories throughout his lifetime. This entailed many revisions and changes which he himself never tried to standardize rigidly into a definitive conceptual system. The need for some sort of a reliable guide which would spell out both the pattern of the evolution of Freud’s thinking, as well as establish its inherent logic, was felt for a long time by both scholars and students of psychoanalysis. Drs. Laplanche and Pontalis of the Association Psychoanalytique de France succeeded admirably in providing a dictionary of Freud’s concepts which is more than a compilation of mere definitions. After many years of creative and industrious research, they were able to give an authentic account of the evolution of each concept with pertinent supporting texts from Freud’s own writing (in the Standard Edition translation), and thus have endowed us with an instrument for work and research which is characterized by its thoroughness, exactitude and lack of prejudice towards dogma. 
The Language of Psychoanalysis has already established itself as a classic and will long continue to be of invaluable use to both student and research-worker in psychoanalysis.

    The Language of Psycho-Analysis

    Jean Laplanche

    The definitive guide to psychoanalytic vocabulary. An indispensible reference book for anyone interested in psychoanalysis. Sigmund Freud evolved his theories throughout his lifetime. This entailed many revisions and changes which he himself never tried to standardize rigidly into a definitive conceptual system. The need for some sort of a reliable guide which would spell out both the pattern of the evolution of Freud’s thinking, as well as establish its inherent logic, was felt for a long time by both scholars and students of psychoanalysis. Drs. Laplanche and Pontalis of the Association Psychoanalytique de France succeeded admirably in providing a dictionary of Freud’s concepts which is more than a compilation of mere definitions. After many years of creative and industrious research, they were able to give an authentic account of the evolution of each concept with pertinent supporting texts from Freud’s own writing (in the Standard Edition translation), and thus have endowed us with an instrument for work and research which is characterized by its thoroughness, exactitude and lack of prejudice towards dogma. The Language of Psychoanalysis has already established itself as a classic and will long continue to be of invaluable use to both student and research-worker in psychoanalysis.

  4. The New Spirit of Capitalism

Luc Boltanski

A century after the publication of Max Weber’s The Protestant Ethic and the “Spirit” of Capitalism a major new work examines network-based organization, employee autonomy and post-Fordist horizontal work structures.**Why is the critique of capitalism so ineffective today? In this major work, the sociologists Eve Chiapello and Luc Boltanski suggest that we should be addressing the crisis of anticapitalist critique by exploring its very roots.

Via an unprecedented analysis of management texts which influenced the thinking of employers and contributed to reorganization of companies over the last decades, the authors trace the contours of a new spirit of capitalism. From the middle of the 1970s onwards, capitalism abandoned the hierarchical Fordist work structure and developed a new network-based form of organization which was founded on employee initiative and relative work autonomy, but at the cost of material and psychological security.

This new spirit of capitalism triumphed thanks to a remarkable recuperation of the “artistic critique”—that which, after May 1968, attacked the alienation of everyday life by capitalism and bureaucracy. At the same time, the “social critique” was disarmed by the appearance of neocapitalism and remained fixated on the old schemas of hierarchical production.

This book, remarkable for its scope and ambition, seeks to lay the basis for a revival of these two complementary critiques.

    The New Spirit of Capitalism

    Luc Boltanski

    A century after the publication of Max Weber’s The Protestant Ethic and the “Spirit” of Capitalism a major new work examines network-based organization, employee autonomy and post-Fordist horizontal work structures.**Why is the critique of capitalism so ineffective today? In this major work, the sociologists Eve Chiapello and Luc Boltanski suggest that we should be addressing the crisis of anticapitalist critique by exploring its very roots.

    Via an unprecedented analysis of management texts which influenced the thinking of employers and contributed to reorganization of companies over the last decades, the authors trace the contours of a new spirit of capitalism. From the middle of the 1970s onwards, capitalism abandoned the hierarchical Fordist work structure and developed a new network-based form of organization which was founded on employee initiative and relative work autonomy, but at the cost of material and psychological security.

    This new spirit of capitalism triumphed thanks to a remarkable recuperation of the “artistic critique”—that which, after May 1968, attacked the alienation of everyday life by capitalism and bureaucracy. At the same time, the “social critique” was disarmed by the appearance of neocapitalism and remained fixated on the old schemas of hierarchical production.

    This book, remarkable for its scope and ambition, seeks to lay the basis for a revival of these two complementary critiques.

  5. The Sublime Object of Psychiatry: Schizophrenia in Clinical and Cultural Theory (International Perspectives in Philosophy and Pychiatry)

Angela Woods

Schizophrenia has been one of psychiatry’s most contested diagnostic categories. It has also served as a metaphor for cultural theorists to interpret modern and postmodern understandings of the self. These radical, compelling, and puzzling appropriations of clinical accounts of schizophrenia have been dismissed by many as illegitimate, insensitive and inappropriate. Until now, no attempt has been made to analyse them systematically, nor has their significance for our broader understanding of this most ‘ununderstandable’ of experiences been addressed.

The Sublime Object of Psychiatry is the first book to study representations of schizophrenia across a wide range of disciplines and discourses: biological and phenomenological psychiatry, psychoanalysis, critical psychology, antipsychiatry, and postmodern philosophy. In part one, Woods offers a fresh analysis of the foundational clinical accounts of schizophrenia, concentrating on the work of Emil Kraepelin, Eugen Bleuler, Karl Jaspers, Sigmund Freud and Jacques Lacan. In the second part of the book, she examines how these accounts were critiqued, adapted, and mobilised in the ‘cultural theory’ of R D Laing, Thomas Szasz, Gilles Deleuze, Felix Guattari, Louis Sass, Fredric Jameson and Jean Baudrillard. Using the aesthetic concept of the sublime as an organising framework, Woods explains how a clinical diagnostic category came to be transformed into a potent metaphor in cultural theory, and how, in that transformation, schizophrenia came to be associated with the everyday experience of modern and postmodern life.

Susan Sontag once wrote: ‘Any important disease whose causality is murky, and for which treatment is ineffectual, tends to be awash in significance’. The Sublime Object of Psychiatry does not provide an answer to the question ‘What is schizophrenia?’, but instead brings clinical and cultural theory into dialogue in order to explain how schizophrenia became ‘awash in significance’.

    The Sublime Object of Psychiatry: Schizophrenia in Clinical and Cultural Theory (International Perspectives in Philosophy and Pychiatry)

    Angela Woods

    Schizophrenia has been one of psychiatry’s most contested diagnostic categories. It has also served as a metaphor for cultural theorists to interpret modern and postmodern understandings of the self. These radical, compelling, and puzzling appropriations of clinical accounts of schizophrenia have been dismissed by many as illegitimate, insensitive and inappropriate. Until now, no attempt has been made to analyse them systematically, nor has their significance for our broader understanding of this most ‘ununderstandable’ of experiences been addressed.

    The Sublime Object of Psychiatry is the first book to study representations of schizophrenia across a wide range of disciplines and discourses: biological and phenomenological psychiatry, psychoanalysis, critical psychology, antipsychiatry, and postmodern philosophy. In part one, Woods offers a fresh analysis of the foundational clinical accounts of schizophrenia, concentrating on the work of Emil Kraepelin, Eugen Bleuler, Karl Jaspers, Sigmund Freud and Jacques Lacan. In the second part of the book, she examines how these accounts were critiqued, adapted, and mobilised in the ‘cultural theory’ of R D Laing, Thomas Szasz, Gilles Deleuze, Felix Guattari, Louis Sass, Fredric Jameson and Jean Baudrillard. Using the aesthetic concept of the sublime as an organising framework, Woods explains how a clinical diagnostic category came to be transformed into a potent metaphor in cultural theory, and how, in that transformation, schizophrenia came to be associated with the everyday experience of modern and postmodern life.

    Susan Sontag once wrote: ‘Any important disease whose causality is murky, and for which treatment is ineffectual, tends to be awash in significance’. The Sublime Object of Psychiatry does not provide an answer to the question ‘What is schizophrenia?’, but instead brings clinical and cultural theory into dialogue in order to explain how schizophrenia became ‘awash in significance’.

  6. Debt: The First 5,000 Years

David Graeber

This is as close as you are going to get to a “Communist Manifesto” of the Occupy Wall Street Movement. He more or less takes Nietzsche’s thesis from the “Genealogy of Morals” and, adding insights from modern anthropology, uses it to make sense of the current social-economic crisis.  I wouldn’t hesitate to call this the “must-read” book of 2011. -bdp

Before there was money, there was debt

Every economics textbook says the same thing: Money was invented to replace onerous and complicated barter systems—to relieve ancient people from having to haul their goods to market. The problem with this version of history? There’s not a shred of evidence to support it.

Here anthropologist David Graeber presents a stunning reversal of conventional wisdom. He shows that for more than 5,000 years, since the beginnings of the first agrarian empires, humans have used elaborate credit systems to buy and sell goods—that is, long before the invention of coins or cash. It is in this era, Graeber argues, that we also first encounter a society divided into debtors and creditors.

Graeber shows that arguments about debt and debt forgiveness have been at the center of political debates from Italy to China, as well as sparking innumerable insurrections. He also brilliantly demonstrates that the language of the ancient works of law and religion (words like “guilt,” “sin,” and “redemption”) derive in large part from ancient debates about debt, and shape even our most basic ideas of right and wrong. We are still fighting these battles today without knowing it.

*Debt: The First 5,000 Years *is a fascinating chronicle of this little known history—as well as how it has defined human history, and what it means for the credit crisis of the present day and the future of our economy.

    Debt: The First 5,000 Years

    David Graeber

    This is as close as you are going to get to a “Communist Manifesto” of the Occupy Wall Street Movement. He more or less takes Nietzsche’s thesis from the “Genealogy of Morals” and, adding insights from modern anthropology, uses it to make sense of the current social-economic crisis. I wouldn’t hesitate to call this the “must-read” book of 2011. -bdp

    Before there was money, there was debt

    Every economics textbook says the same thing: Money was invented to replace onerous and complicated barter systems—to relieve ancient people from having to haul their goods to market. The problem with this version of history? There’s not a shred of evidence to support it.

    Here anthropologist David Graeber presents a stunning reversal of conventional wisdom. He shows that for more than 5,000 years, since the beginnings of the first agrarian empires, humans have used elaborate credit systems to buy and sell goods—that is, long before the invention of coins or cash. It is in this era, Graeber argues, that we also first encounter a society divided into debtors and creditors.

    Graeber shows that arguments about debt and debt forgiveness have been at the center of political debates from Italy to China, as well as sparking innumerable insurrections. He also brilliantly demonstrates that the language of the ancient works of law and religion (words like “guilt,” “sin,” and “redemption”) derive in large part from ancient debates about debt, and shape even our most basic ideas of right and wrong. We are still fighting these battles today without knowing it.

    *Debt: The First 5,000 Years *is a fascinating chronicle of this little known history—as well as how it has defined human history, and what it means for the credit crisis of the present day and the future of our economy.

  7. Salesforce CRM: The Definitive Admin Handbook

Paul Goodey

A practical guide through which you will discover how to set up and configure the application. Along the way, you will also be presented with solutions and real-life examples on how to further improve and maintain its functionality with clear step-by-step instructions. Being highly organized and compact, this book contains detailed instructions with screenshots, diagrams, and tips that clearly describe how you can administer and configure complex Salesforce CRM functionality with absolute ease. This book is for administrators who want to develop and strengthen their Salesforce CRM skills in the areas of configuration and system management. Whether you are a novice or a more experienced admin, this book aims to enhance your knowledge and understanding of the Salesforce CRM platform. By the end of the book, you will be ready to configure and administer a Salesforce CRM system in a real-world environment which fully supports your business needs.

    Salesforce CRM: The Definitive Admin Handbook

    Paul Goodey

    A practical guide through which you will discover how to set up and configure the application. Along the way, you will also be presented with solutions and real-life examples on how to further improve and maintain its functionality with clear step-by-step instructions. Being highly organized and compact, this book contains detailed instructions with screenshots, diagrams, and tips that clearly describe how you can administer and configure complex Salesforce CRM functionality with absolute ease. This book is for administrators who want to develop and strengthen their Salesforce CRM skills in the areas of configuration and system management. Whether you are a novice or a more experienced admin, this book aims to enhance your knowledge and understanding of the Salesforce CRM platform. By the end of the book, you will be ready to configure and administer a Salesforce CRM system in a real-world environment which fully supports your business needs.

  8. Civilization and Its Discontents

Sigmund Freud

Throughout history, some books have changed the world. They have transformed the way we see ourselves - and each other. They have inspired debate, dissent, war and revolution. They have enlightened, outraged, provoked and comforted. They have enriched lives - and destroyed them. Now Penguin brings you the works of the great thinkers, pioneers, radicals and visionaries whose ideas shook civilization, and helped make us who we are.

    Civilization and Its Discontents

    Sigmund Freud

    Throughout history, some books have changed the world. They have transformed the way we see ourselves - and each other. They have inspired debate, dissent, war and revolution. They have enlightened, outraged, provoked and comforted. They have enriched lives - and destroyed them. Now Penguin brings you the works of the great thinkers, pioneers, radicals and visionaries whose ideas shook civilization, and helped make us who we are.

  9. Bruce Davidson: Subway

Bruce Davidson

via @billyancey: “Been waiting a long time for this to be reissued. I Just got my copy in the mail today, and it’s perfect. If you’re a luddite like myself and still appreciate the heft and inefficiency of (gasp) books, then go for it. It’s probably not for everyone, but I think it’s one of the greatest photo series of all time by one of my favorite photographers. If nothing else, take the time to have a look at the image search results and then go for a walk or something to make up for allowing that to suffice”.

Bruce Davidson’s groundbreaking Subway, first published by Aperture in 1986, has garnered critical acclaim both as a documentation of a unique moment in the cultural fabric of New York City and for its phenomenal use of extremes of color and shadow set against flash-lit skin. In Davidson’s own words, “the people in the subway, their flesh juxtaposed against the graffiti, the penetrating effect of the strobe light itself, and even the hollow darkness of the tunnels, inspired an aesthetic that goes unnoticed by passengers who are trapped underground, hiding behind masks and closed off from each other.” In this third edition of what is now a classic of photographic literature, a sequence of 118 (including 25 previously unpublished) images transport the viewer through a landscape at times menacing, and at other times lyrical and soulful. The images present the full gamut of New Yorkers, from weary straphangers and languorous ladies in summer dresses to stalking predators and homeless persons. Davidson’s accompanying text tells the story behind the images, clarifying his method and dramatizing his obsession with the subway, its rhythms and its particular madness.Bruce Davidson (born 1933) is considered one of America’s most influential documentary photographers. He began taking photographs when he was ten, and studied at the Rochester Institute of Technology and the Yale University School of Design. In 1958 he became a member of Magnum Photos, and in 1962 he received a Guggenheim Fellowship to document the civil rights movement. After a solo exhibition at The Museum of Modern Art in 1963, Davidson spent two years photographing in Harlem, resulting in the book East 100th Street. In 1980, after living in New York City for 23 years, Davidson began Subway, his startling color essay of urban life.

    Bruce Davidson: Subway

    Bruce Davidson

    via @billyancey: “Been waiting a long time for this to be reissued. I Just got my copy in the mail today, and it’s perfect. If you’re a luddite like myself and still appreciate the heft and inefficiency of (gasp) books, then go for it. It’s probably not for everyone, but I think it’s one of the greatest photo series of all time by one of my favorite photographers. If nothing else, take the time to have a look at the image search results and then go for a walk or something to make up for allowing that to suffice”.

    Bruce Davidson’s groundbreaking Subway, first published by Aperture in 1986, has garnered critical acclaim both as a documentation of a unique moment in the cultural fabric of New York City and for its phenomenal use of extremes of color and shadow set against flash-lit skin. In Davidson’s own words, “the people in the subway, their flesh juxtaposed against the graffiti, the penetrating effect of the strobe light itself, and even the hollow darkness of the tunnels, inspired an aesthetic that goes unnoticed by passengers who are trapped underground, hiding behind masks and closed off from each other.” In this third edition of what is now a classic of photographic literature, a sequence of 118 (including 25 previously unpublished) images transport the viewer through a landscape at times menacing, and at other times lyrical and soulful. The images present the full gamut of New Yorkers, from weary straphangers and languorous ladies in summer dresses to stalking predators and homeless persons. Davidson’s accompanying text tells the story behind the images, clarifying his method and dramatizing his obsession with the subway, its rhythms and its particular madness.
    Bruce Davidson (born 1933) is considered one of America’s most influential documentary photographers. He began taking photographs when he was ten, and studied at the Rochester Institute of Technology and the Yale University School of Design. In 1958 he became a member of Magnum Photos, and in 1962 he received a Guggenheim Fellowship to document the civil rights movement. After a solo exhibition at The Museum of Modern Art in 1963, Davidson spent two years photographing in Harlem, resulting in the book East 100th Street. In 1980, after living in New York City for 23 years, Davidson began Subway, his startling color essay of urban life.

  10. I Am Alive and You Are Dead: A Journey into the Mind of Philip K. Dick

Emmanuel Carrere


  For his many devoted readers, Philip K. Dick is not only one of the “one of the most valiant psychological explorers of the 20th century” (The New York Times) but a source of divine revelation. In the riveting style that won accolades for The Adversary, Emmanuel Carrère follows Dick’s strange odyssey from his traumatic beginnings in 1928, when his twin sister died in infancy, to his lonely end in 1982, beset by mystical visions of swirling pink light, three-eyed invaders, and messages from the Roman Empire. Drawing on interviews as well as unpublished sources, he vividly conjures the spirit of this restless observer of American postwar malaise who subverted the materials of science fiction—parallel universes, intricate time loops, collective delusions—to create classic works of contemporary anxiety.

    I Am Alive and You Are Dead: A Journey into the Mind of Philip K. Dick

    Emmanuel Carrere

    For his many devoted readers, Philip K. Dick is not only one of the “one of the most valiant psychological explorers of the 20th century” (The New York Times) but a source of divine revelation. In the riveting style that won accolades for The Adversary, Emmanuel Carrère follows Dick’s strange odyssey from his traumatic beginnings in 1928, when his twin sister died in infancy, to his lonely end in 1982, beset by mystical visions of swirling pink light, three-eyed invaders, and messages from the Roman Empire. Drawing on interviews as well as unpublished sources, he vividly conjures the spirit of this restless observer of American postwar malaise who subverted the materials of science fiction—parallel universes, intricate time loops, collective delusions—to create classic works of contemporary anxiety.

Otlet's Shelf theme by Andrew LeClair & Rob Giampietro.